Connected and Automated Vehicles

This quarterly update summarizes key federal legislative and regulatory developments in the first quarter of 2022 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”), and data privacy, and highlights a few particularly notable developments in the States.  In the first quarter of 2022, Congress and the Administration focused on required assessments and funding for AI, restrictions on targeted advertising using personal data collected from individuals and connected devices, creating rules to enhance CAV safety, and children’s privacy topics.

Continue Reading U.S. AI, IoT, CAV, and Privacy Legislative Update – First Quarter 2022

A recent AAA study revealed that, although the pandemic has resulted in fewer cars on the road, traffic deaths have surged.  Speeding, alcohol-impairment, and reckless driving has caused the highest levels of crashes seen in decades, and the National Safety Council estimates a 9% increase in roadway fatalities from 2020.  Autonomous vehicles (AVs) have the potential to increase traffic safety, and the California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) just took a step to advance their commercialization and deployment.

Continue Reading CPUC Issues First Autonomous Vehicle Drivered Deployment Permits

In 2021, European lawmakers and agencies issued a number of proposals to regulate artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), connected and automated vehicles (“CAV”), and data privacy, as well as reports and funding programs to pursue the developments in these emerging areas.  From the adoption of more stringent cybersecurity standards for IoT devices

The EU was particularly active in furthering its digital strategy in 2021, and will likely continue this high level of activity into 2022.  Below, we briefly summarize last year’s key legislative and regulatory updates from the EU across the following areas:

  1. data transfers;
  2. cookies (and alike) and unsolicited marketing communications;
  3. cybersecurity;
  4. open data;
  5. intermediary services;

In 2021, countries in EMEA continued to focus on the legal constructs around artificial intelligence (“AI”), and the momentum continues in 2022. The EU has been particularly active in AI—from its proposed horizontal AI regulation to recent enforcement and guidance—and will continue to be active going into 2022. Similarly, the UK follows closely behind with

NHTSA recently issued a First Amended Standing General Order requiring electronic portal submission of crash incident data for automated and semi-autonomous vehicles. As of August 12, 2021, automated motor vehicle manufacturers, motor vehicle equipment manufacturers, and operators will be required to report and upload crash incident data within 24 hours to the NHTSA Incident Report

On June 24, 2020, the United Nations Economic Commission for Europe (“UNECE”)* adopted two regulations that will have a significant impact on manufacturers of connected and autonomous vehicles (“CAVs”). These regulations impose obligations relating to cybersecurity and software updates for passenger cars, vans, trucks, and buses, while the cybersecurity regulations also reach light four-wheeler vehicles if equipped with automated driving functionalities from level 3 (conditional automation) onward. The regulations will enter into force in January 2021.

The European Union, South Korea, and Japan are expected to take steps to adopt these UNECE regulations in their respective national laws in the next couple of years. Given the widespread use of UN Regulations in the automotive sector globally, we anticipate that other countries will also adopt these regulations. Once implemented, any manufacturer that sells vehicles in the implementing countries must comply with the regulatory requirements, including by ensuring that its supply chain would not prevent compliance. As a result, the effects of the regulations are likely to flow down to vehicle manufacturers even in countries that do not adopt them, such as the United States.
Continue Reading IoT Update: UN Takes the Driver’s Seat for International Regulations on Connected and Autonomous Vehicles Cybersecurity and Software Updates

In this update, we detail the key legislative updates in the second quarter of 2020 related to artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), cybersecurity as it relates to AI and IoT, and connected and automated vehicles (“CAVs”). The volume of legislation on these topics has slowed but not ceased, as lawmakers increasingly focus on the pandemic and the upcoming national election. As Congress processes Appropriations bills, it continues to look to support and fund these technologies. We will continue to update you on meaningful developments between these quarterly updates across our blogs.
Continue Reading U.S. AI, IoT, and CAV Legislative Update – Second Quarter 2020

The COVID-19 pandemic has created both speed bumps and accelerants for connected and automated vehicle (“CAV”) developments in the United States.  In our Quarterly Update earlier this month, we covered recent legislative and regulatory activity around CAVs, both specifically targeted efforts and those impacting AI and IoT technologies generally.  Although some CAV legislative efforts have been sidelined due to the government’s focus on COVID-19, the pandemic is incentivizing policymakers at the federal and state levels to support CAV-related initiatives.

Continue Reading IoT Update: COVID-19 Drives Forward Connected and Automated Vehicle Legislative and Regulatory Efforts

Though it seems like the distant past now, in this update we detail the notable legislative events from the first quarter of 2020 on artificial intelligence (“AI”), the Internet of Things (“IoT”), cybersecurity as it relates to AI and IoT, and connected and autonomous vehicles (“CAVs”). Prior to the slowdown in non-COVID related legislation that accompanied the pandemic during the first quarter, federal and state policymakers continued their focus on AI and IoT, including by introducing substantive bills that would regulate the use of such technology and by supporting bills aimed at further study of how such technology may impact different sectors. And it is important to note that this activity has slowed, not ceased—we will continue to update you on meaningful developments between these quarterly updates across our blogs.
Continue Reading U.S. AI and IoT Legislative Update – First Quarter 2020