Kayvan Farchadi is a summer associate who attends George Washington University Law School.

Follow: Email

The newly enacted National Defense Authorization Act (“NDAA”) contains important provisions regarding the development and deployment of artificial intelligence (“AI”) and machine learning technologies, many of which build upon previous legislation introduced in the 116th Congress. The most substantial federal U.S. legislation on AI to date, these provisions will have significant implications in the national security sector and beyond. The measures in the NDAA will coordinate a national strategy on research, development, and deployment of AI, guiding investment and aligning priorities for its use.

President Trump had vetoed the NDAA after its initial passage in December, but the $740 billion NDAA became law over the objection of President Trump’s veto with a rare New Year’s Day Senate vote, 81-13. The House voted to override President Trump’s veto on December 28, on a 322-87 vote.

This post highlights some of the key AI provisions included in the NDAA.
Continue Reading AI Update: Provisions in the National Defense Authorization Act Signal the Importance of AI to American Competitiveness

In February 2020, the Trump Administration released the American Artificial Intelligence Initiative’s One Year Annual Report, detailing the Administration’s progress since launching its “American Artificial Intelligence Initiative” by signing Executive Order 13859 on February 11, 2019.  The Administration’s Report highlights areas where it identifies progress in advancing the United States’ competitive position in fostering advancement in AI technology, including limiting new regulations, increasing funding and tracking of federal AI research and development, increasing access to federal data and computing resources, and promoting international collaboration.
Continue Reading AI Update: Trump Administration Releases American Artificial Intelligence Initiative’s One Year Annual Report

The House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection held a hearing this week to discuss the State of Modern Application, Research, and Trends of IoT Act (SMART IoT Act). This proposed legislation would direct the Secretary of Commerce to conduct a comprehensive study of the IoT industry and Federal agencies with jurisdiction over the IoT industry, as well as all IoT regulations and policies implemented by those agencies. The SMART IoT Act would also require the Secretary of Commerce to produce a report to Congress within one year of the bill’s enactment, detailing the results of the study and recommendations for enabling the secure growth of IoT.  Although this legislation has not yet been formally introduced, the Subcommittee on Digital Commerce and Consumer Protection has published the bill’s full text as well as a summary.

Three witnesses testified:

  • Tim Day, Senior Vice President, Chamber Technology Engagement Center, U.S. Chamber of Commerce;
  • Michelle Richardson, Deputy Director, Freedom, Security, and Technology Project, Center for Democracy and Technology; and
  • Dipti Vachani, Vice President, Internet of Things Group, General Manager, Platform Management and Customer Engineering, Intel Corporation

At the hearing, the SMART IoT Act drew broad support from all of the witnesses as well as from members on both sides of the aisle. However, there were differing opinions regarding the focus of the study called for by the SMART IoT Act, as well as the next steps that Congress should take with respect to IoT.
Continue Reading IoT Update: Congress Hears Testimony on IoT Legislation